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Test drive Internet Explorer 9


evilfantasy

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ok so i have it installed .now what the heck is this .i was thinking browser9

IE..problem my falt .for thinking this.

perhaps its a tester of some sort ?

or a part preview?

can you ex plane it .it seems to brows ok.when entering a link.but how safe is it?

i can make out its a preview of ie 9 i think..

and very limited capabilities..this seems .a bit of the upcoming new IE

and i think allows to have a lookie see..

but this app i installed is nothing like a browser .as say version 8..

or a fire fox type browsing..perhaps we supposed to report bugs?

and use the surfer as testers..?only..

 

i think perhaps any one new to pc-ing leave it well alone.i have not idea how

dangerous it is ..as my filters went silly using it.it stats at there test page .

then you pick a mode.

and then try to surf..when i entered my in gen and toyed, run it from there it just oped my bird browser..but as i say my filters started blocking like crazy..

 

So be aware ..its not a safe environment to be in.using this..

 

 

 

 

itsmejjj

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Hi jjj,

 

If you have a look and try the Demos included, it demonstrades the ability of IE9, when it is available fully for the public. Also some of the encoding of the functions are given.

 

At the moment it is just a preview, even without any <Back or >Forward functions.

 

How safe is it? Time will show that.

 

I wouldn't use it for normal browsing at the moment.

 

Cheers.

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Hi jjj,

 

If you have a look and try the Demos included, it demonstrades the ability of IE9, when it is available fully for the public. Also some of the encoding of the functions are given.

 

At the moment it is just a preview, even without any <Back or >Forward functions.

 

How safe is it? Time will show that.

 

I wouldn't use it for normal browsing at the moment.

 

Cheers.

 

yes i agree we were posting at the same time..

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  • 3 weeks later...

I recently expressed a lack of surprise that Internet Explorer 9 will almost certainly not be supported on Windows XP. In Redmond's words, a "modern browser" needs a "modern operating system," and Windows XP doesn't qualify. Much to my surprise (well, not really, I know that XP is still used and, apparently, loved by many), many doubted my characterization of XP as "obsolete," and they questioned my lack of surprise at this decision.

 

Simple things first. Windows XP is not a new operating system. Windows XP was released in 2001, and it has been succeeded by not one, but two newer operating systems: Windows Vista, and Windows 7. The other major desktop platform vendor—Apple—doesn't even begin to support anything that old, and the company routinely restricts its software compatibility to only the most recent version or two of its operating system.

 

Now, it's true that software is not like physical goods; while the ravages of time may make hardware break down, Windows XP works as well today as it did when it was new. Better, if you consider the extensive capabilities added in Service Packs and free downloads. But the computing world does not stand still; working as well as it did when it was new means that Windows XP hasn't kept up with computing's advances. The next generation of hard disks (or indeed, current generation, for Western Digital users), for example, are at risk of suffering severe performance penalties on XP systems. To get the best from the technology that for many has replaced spinning disks—the solid state drive—requires support for the TRIM command, found natively only in Windows 7. XP similarly lacks any built-in support for Blu-ray discs.

 

But what of Web browsers? A Web browser doesn't much care about, say, disk technology, so although it's undoubtable that XP requires more effort to use on modern hardware, this alone shouldn't be a reason for a Web browser to skip the platform. Do Windows Vista and Windows 7 offer capabilities that XP lacks that are relevant to IE9?

 

I think a pretty compelling case can be made that yes, in fact, they do. IPv6 is—fingers crossed—a technology that will become far more prevalent in the coming years, as the IPv4 address space finally starts to run out. XP does support IPv6 in a limited way, but it can only be configured using arcane command-line syntax. Windows Vista added GUI configuration and made IPv6 a first-class citizen on the network, and Windows 7 rounds out IPv6 support by including support for ancilary technology such as DHCPv6. XP is simply ill-prepared for an IPv6 world.

 

 

http://arstechnica.com/microsoft/news/2010/04/why-microsoft-did-the-right-thing-in-ditching-xp-for-ie9.ars

 

read here for the full story

 

ascot

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