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Copy/Paste Size Limit in W-7 ?


Toppack

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Does anyone know what the Copy/Paste size limit is when using W-7 and NTFS-formated drives?

Every time I copy complete drives or partitions to an external drive,

Not all folders and data-files get copied, if they are large. :-(

 

I get No message, letting me know it was Not all copied, either. :sad:

 

I remember there was a limit of about 5.GB with the Old FAT type format,

but I've not been able to find the limit for NTFS and W-7.

 

I'm guessing it's about 100.GB, from what I've seen.

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Thanks for link,

I'm still Not sure and I don't think anyone Else is either. ;-)

Some say there is No limit, but there Must be Something Limiting the size.

 

I don't see how it could be RAM or Virtual-RAM (page-file),

since I have more than enough Page-file space on the drives.

 

So, I think It would have be the size of the data being copied and something in the way Windows handles the data.

 

I'll try Drag/Drop instead of Copy/Paste, next time I do the partition copies,

to see if that makes a difference.

I thought they were the Same but maybe not?

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  • 2 months later...

hi Toppack

My guess is that in a 64 bit computer the limit in fx. Notebook would be 2^64 bits, to account for those bytes that may use more than 8 bits - which is unlikely in your case let us settle on 10 bits to the byte - that would mean that the file size of that totally filled notebook file would be

18446744073709551616 bits - 1844674407370955161 bytes →1,8 trillion bytes (in European designation)

I know that in a 32 bit computer the maximum number of bits that can be written in Notebook is 4294967296 bits (>4 billion US designation).

I know because I once filled up my empty space with zeroes to overwrite deleted leftovers. I had to make 8 notebook files to do that - these I afterwards deleted to get my empty space back - more clean than before!! :-)

Cheers

solbjerg.

p.s. the theoretical capacity of 2^64 bits will of course not be possible in the largest commercial computers of today - they "only" hold around 1 terabytes in their harddisk (what you would call a trillion bytes) 2^40.

It also depends on how your computer is set up - the amount of RAM especially, from what I have read you should not expect more than 300 gB capacity for a file.

There are also other different limits in different applications, so you would have to become an expert to figure it out by yourself on the different computers you own.

 

 

Drag/Drop does work better than Copy/Paste! :shock:

Very Strange! :roll:

 

The 'Copy' command does Not copy all sub-folders when doing very large partitions, of 400.GB or more.

(At least it won't on our computers)

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Hi Toppack

You will have to become an expert on size limitations in both computers and applications.

See my p.s. in my previous post :-)

Cheers

solbjerg

p.p.s. Perhaps our own Effendi enoskype knows more about it :-)

 

 

hi Toppack

My guess is that in a 64 bit computer the limit in fx. Notebook would be 2^64 bits, to account for those bytes that may use more than 8 bits - which is unlikely in your case let us settle on 10 bits to the byte - that would mean that the file size of that totally filled notebook file would be

18446744073709551616 bits - 1844674407370955161 bytes →1,8 trillion bytes (in European designation)

I know that in a 32 bit computer the maximum number of bits that can be written in Notebook is 4294967296 bits (>4 billion US designation).

I know because I once filled up my empty space with zeroes to overwrite deleted leftovers. I had to make 8 notebook files to do that (32 gB) - these I afterwards deleted to get my empty space back - more clean than before!! :-)

Cheers

solbjerg.

p.s. the theoretical capacity of 2^64 bits will of course not be possible in the largest commercial computers of today - they "only" hold around 1 terabytes in their harddisk (what you would call a trillion bytes) 2^40.

It also depends on how your computer is set up - the amount of RAM especially, from what I have read you should not expect more than 300 gB capacity for a file.

There are also other different limits in different applications, so you would have to become an expert to figure it out by yourself on the different computers you own.

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hi

 

copy past probably size.

drop drag any size so long as the drive is bigger than the file itself..and has spare room preferred .

 

and depending on how big it is vary in pasting (moving the data) speed wise

 

 

I never had any issues with how large,thy are, I cut and pasted 860 GB to a external box USB no errors or any loss of any file or any directory's.

 

So my way of thinking on the ask , is no limit .as to how much can be moved at the same time. and no limit As long as you have the drive that has more space than the file moved to it . but a tip

if you do something like 300gb or larger ,do not run any thing else ,go make a coffee ,till its done

as the sort of movement uses a lot of power (CPU) up to 100% but mostly round 90% and will use most of your memory .so its best not to use the unit till its done moving..by the way this can be very very slow and depending on what you have or use ..you think it will never end

 

I did this one time ,and never again usually stick to round the 10 gig mark

or smaller ..

 

 

Mr Bean

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Hi Mr Bean

Thank you!

That probably tells us that the 2^64 bit holds but that the size of the capacity of the computer is lagging far behind the theoretical size limit of a file.

Cheers

solbjerg

 

hi

 

copy past probably size.

drop drag any size so long as the drive is bigger than the file itself..and has spare room preferred .

 

and depending on how big it is vary in pasting (moving the data) speed wise

 

 

I never had any issues with how large,thy are, I cut and pasted 860 GB to a external box USB no errors or any loss of any file or any directory's.

 

So my way of thinking on the ask , is no limit .as to how much can be moved at the same time. and no limit As long as you have the drive that has more space than the file moved to it . but a tip

if you do something like 300gb or larger ,do not run any thing else ,go make a coffee ,till its done

as the sort of movement uses a lot of power (CPU) up to 100% but mostly round 90% and will use most of your memory .so its best not to use the unit till its done moving..by the way this can be very very slow and depending on what you have or use ..you think it will never end

 

I did this one time ,and never again usually stick to round the 10 gig mark

or smaller ..

 

 

Mr Bean

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Here is some relevant information:

 

Limit to what a single folder or directory can hold?

 

There's no practical limit on the combined sizes of all the files in a folder, though there may be limits on the number of files in a folder. More importantly, there are limits on individual file size that depend on what filesystem you're using on your hard disk. (The "filesystem" is nothing more than the specification of exactly how files are store on disk.)

Let's break this down by file system:

  • FAT ie. FAT16
    FAT, for File Allocation Table, is the successor to the original FAT12 filesystem that shipped with MS-DOS many, many years ago.
    • Maximum disk size: 4 gigabytes
    • Maximum file size: 4 gigabytes
    • Maximum number of files on disk: 65,517
    • Maximum number of files in a single folder: 512 (if I recall correctly, the root folder "/" had a lower limit of 128).

    [*]FAT32

    "There's no practical limit on the combined sizes of all the files in a folder, though there may be limits on the number of files in a folder."

    FAT32 was introduced to overcome some of the limitations of FAT16.

    • Maximum disk size: 2 terabytes
    • Maximum file size: 4 gigabytes
    • Maximum number of files on disk: 268,435,437
    • Maximum number of files in a single folder: 65,534

    [*]NTFS

    NTFS, or "New Technology File System" introduced with Windows NT, is a completely redesigned file system.

    • Maximum disk size: 256 terabytes
    • Maximum file size: 256 terabytes
    • Maximum number of files on disk: 4,294,967,295
    • Maximum number of files in a single folder: 4,294,967,295

Note that when it is said "disk" above, it is about "logical" disks, not necessarily physical. No one makes a 256 terabyte disk drive, but using NTFS you can treat an array of disk drives as a single logical disk. Presumably if you have enough of them, you can build a huge logical drive.

Also note that the NTFS's 256 terabyte limitation may well simply be an implementation restriction - NTFS format can support disks up to 16 exabytes (16 x 1,152,921,504,606,846,976 bytes).

So there are two important take-aways from all that data as it relates to the original question:

  1. Nowhere was there a limit of the size of the contents of a folder. Limits on the number of files, yes, but nothing size related.
  2. You probably want to make sure your disk is formatted NTFS. FAT32's 4 gigabytes for a single file just isn't enough any more, especially if you're collecting video or other storage-intensive media.

Cheers.
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