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C drive grayed out solid state?


jckinnick

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Hi jckinnick

I am sorry I didn't look close enogh on your first image - It does say that what you are looking at is disk C: (it is selected as you can see from its color)

But I only at that time noticed that your D: drive was ticked and went on from there. Sorry!

So it seems that all is as it should be. SSD drives should not be defragged!!! Which your first screenshot shows that it hasn't been.

To be absolutely certain please give us a screenshot of your D:\ drive either defragged or fragmented or the Report.

Thank you

Cheers

solbjerg

p.s. thanks enoskype!!! :-)

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Hi jckinnick

I am sorry I didn't look close enogh on your first image - It does say that what you are looking at is disk C: (it is selected as you can see from its color)

But I only at that time noticed that your D: drive was ticked and went on from there. Sorry!

So it seems that all is as it should be. SSD drives should not be defragged!!! Which your first screenshot shows that it hasn't been.

To be absolutely certain please give us a screenshot of your D:\ drive either defragged or fragmented or the Report.

Thank you

Cheers

solbjerg

p.s. thanks enoskype!!! :-)

 

 

 

 

 

Thats what i was worried about ive been defraging it since last summer do you think ive done any damage?

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Hi jckinnick

No I don't think they have been defragged.

I do not think SmartDefrag will defrag them.

But it looks like your D: drive isn't a SSD so let's see a screenshot of that drive please.

Cheers

solbjerg

 

Thats what i was worried about ive been defraging it since last summer do you think ive done any damage?
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Hi jckinnick

No I don't think they have been defragged.

I do not think SmartDefrag will defrag them.

But it looks like your D: drive isn't a SSD so let's see a screenshot of that drive please.

Cheers

solbjerg

 

But I've been defraging them with Windows defragmenter and the previous version of Smart Defrag since last summer. That's why i was worried.

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Hi jckinnick

In the previous versions I think there was a the setting to NOT defrag SSD, now in the newer version it seems as if that setting is gone, but that the program just doesn't defrag SSD.

They (SSD) should not be defragged - on the other hand it will not do damage as such I think, but it will lower the lifetime of the SolidStateDisk - I think they have something like a billion overwrites in them so even if you have defragged them I would not expect an immenent breakdown.

If you experience trouble cleaning your driver cache you should abstain from doing so.

Cheers

solbjerg

 

 

But I've been defraging them with Windows defragmenter and the previous version of Smart Defrag since last summer. That's why i was worried.
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  • 2 weeks later...

Hi jckinnick!

 

The Ccleaner Driver wipe function creates a huge file composing of all the free disk space on your drive. It then deletes the file. It would seem logical that this would use one of the writes from the life of those sections of the SSD that it "wipes".

 

I can't see any benefit of defagging your registry if it is on the SSD. As the concept behind a SSD eliminates the physically moving parts that slow down information access on a standard hard drive (one BIG reason you are defragging a standard HD is to minimize the physical work and speed the HD reaction time). Since your CPU can access all information on a SSD equally fast, defragging your registry would have no benefit and would only shorten its life.

 

Sincerely,

-Mel

Live long and prosper!

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Hi jckinnick

In a SSD computer the registry is also located in SSD so the same applies, - no reason to defrag it, and it will be detrimental to the lifespan of the "disc".

Also the registry defrag in a standard harddisk is not something that is useful/necessary very often, which is why the function for the most part will give a message "that it isn't necessary to defragment the registry as it already is defragmented".

Generally one should mess with the registry as little as possible in my opinion. Some benefit may come from it if used a couple of times a year, but not so much as to be discernible to the human senses I think.

Cheers

solbjerg

p.s. We are all brought up to tidy up and clean the place we live, but using chlorine for the cleaning every day or several times a day is to overdo it in my opinion :-)

 

 

What about registry defraging?
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Hi jckinnick!

 

What about it?? I don't have Revo Pro so I cannot answer your question and it seems like a new question? Most all drive wipers behave in a similar manner. They read the disk and create a huge file to overwrite the empty space... and then delete it. The files they write are different, but they work similarly I believe.

 

Don't understand what you mean by this..

evidence of work on C drive
Do you mean that you have installed a new HD and are having trouble getting your system to write on it? Or that you have moved a HD from another machine and are having trouble getting your machine to write on it? Please describe what you mean. And what has this to do with all the solid state drive questions... is it a different machine? This seems very befuddling to me!

 

I investigated this a couple of years ago... so something may have changed. As data will naturally overwrite the deleted or blank areas OK anyway without "wiping" them I have never understood why somebody would want to do this??! It seems unnecessary!

 

Sincerely,

-Mel

Live long and prosper!

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What about it?? I don't have Revo Pro so I cannot answer your question and it seems like a new question? Most all drive wipers behave in a similar manner. They read the disk and create a huge file to overwrite the empty space... and then delete it. The files they write are different, but they work similarly I believe.

 

Don't understand what you mean by this.. Do you mean that you have installed a new HD and are having trouble getting your system to write on it? Or that you have moved a HD from another machine and are having trouble getting your machine to write on it? Please describe what you mean. And what has this to do with all the solid state drive questions... is it a different machine? This seems very befuddling to me!

 

I investigated this a couple of years ago... so something may have changed. As data will naturally overwrite the deleted or blank areas OK anyway without "wiping" them I have never understood why somebody would want to do this??! It seems unnecessary!

 

Sincerely,

-Mel

Live long and prosper!

 

 

It says this tool only effects the already deleted data. Yes this is a new question.

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It says this tool only effects the already deleted data. Yes this is a new question.

 

Thats what drive wipers do by definition... affect the already deleted data along with all other available free space by writing over it:wink:. So what is the question?

 

 

Sincerely,

-Mel

Live long and prosper!

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Hi jckinnick!

 

If the wiping program (whoever manufactures it) performs the "wipe" as I have described it (by writing a huge file and deleting it), then you will have effectively used one of the writes from those areas of your SSD. Same as here... post number 35.

 

Sincerely,

-Mel

Live long and prosper!

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In my opinion, even with todays SSD standards, no harm will be done to an SSD drive if it is wiped once in a while and even when defragmented once in a while in its life span.

 

We are talking about write endurance rating of 1 to 5 million. For perfect wear leveling, which means we need to fill the disk 2 million times to get to the write endurance limit can be assumed.

Please read the quote from Zsolt Kerekes below.

As a sanity check - I found some data from Mtron (one of the few SSD oems who do quote endurance in a way that non specialists can understand). In the data sheet for their 32G product - which incidentally has 5 million cycles write endurance - they quote the write endurance for the disk as "greater than 85 years assuming 100G / day erase/write cycles" - which involves overwriting the disk 3 times a day.

 

Cheers. :lol:

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In my opinion, even with todays SSD standards, no harm will be done to an SSD drive if it is wiped once in a while and even when defragmented once in a while in its life span.

 

We are talking about write endurance rating of 1 to 5 million. For perfect wear leveling, which means we need to fill the disk 2 million times to get to the write endurance limit can be assumed.

Please read the quote from Zsolt Kerekes below.

 

 

Cheers. :lol:

 

All I know is that SSDs have a very High Failure-Rate,

compared to HDs. :roll:

 

I have one of those expensive Paper-weights myself. :-(

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OK Toppack accepted, but what I am trying to say is that, whatever the failure rate, the probability of the reason of the failure beeing from either wiping or defragmenting once in a while, would be extremely low.

 

Also, SSDs of today are much more durable then yesterday. :wink:

 

Just for the information, myself being a defragmentation freak, have been defragmenting flash drives heavily at the time of Win98, and never had a failure of them unless physically abused. Please also note that the sizes of flash drives were much smaller at that time which is another factor for quicker failure.

 

Cheers.

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