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.tiff files


Ted

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I received a packet of .tiff files from a friend and converted them to .jpg. I was amazed to find that the .tiff files are very much smaller that the jpgs. The clarity of the .tiff files is every bit as good as the jpgs, so what are the pros and cons of the two types?

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Are you sure you got the sizes right? usually .Tiff are alot bigger than JPEG.

 

JPEG images are designed for website's, JPEG are compressed image files but .Tiff hold a lot more detail and information, so file sizes are generally bigger.

 

Personally i use TIFF for printing high quality prints from RAW files and JPEG as online proofs for clients.

 

.TIFF

 

Pros: Great quality, no compression, standard in printing business.

 

Cons: Large file size, sometimes change of colour balance.

 

JPEG

 

Pros: Everyone uses and knows what JPEG is, easily transferable, small file size.

 

Cons: Loss of quality and also colour.

 

Hope that helps some what.

 

wrexe

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Hi Ted

.tiff → tagged image format file gives you information about the color of the pixels in their specific location

i.e. line 20 / coloumn 20 → blue

 

.bmp → bit map picture gives you the colors of all the bits of the picture.

i.e. blue → line 20 / coloumn 20

.tiff and .bmp are usually close in size

 

.jepg/jpg → joint expert picture group gives you the location of all the pixels with approximately the same color.

i.e. blue → line 20/21/22/50/51 ~ / coloumn 20/21/22/50/51 ~

This uses far fewer Kbytes to describe the picture, which is why it is most often used for sending pictures or where quality isn't of paramount importance.

If you want the picture in the best possible quality you use either .tiff or .bmp

Cheers

solbjerg

p.s. there are several others i.e. RAW or TARGA that are sometimes used by specialists

 

 

 

I received a packet of .tiff files from a friend and converted them to .jpg. I was amazed to find that the .tiff files are very much smaller that the jpgs. The clarity of the .tiff files is every bit as good as the jpgs, so what are the pros and cons of the two types?
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Thanks to everyone for all the helpful information. Strange about the sizes, though. They are genealogy files apparently downloaded from the Scotlands People website and none of them are any larger than 55kbs.

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Hi Ted

I just tested it by making a screenshot and saving it first as .tiff (256 KB)

and then as .bmp (2 MB)

So in that instance the .tiff file doesn't become exessively large - 8 times smaller than .bmp in fact.

Saving it as .jpg yields 94 KB

If it is a screenshot of text saved as .tiff it can be even much smaller.

Have no explanation about that at the moment :-)

I have only used .tiff myself in Microsoft office document scanning and there they were usually like a .bmp i.e. 2 MB or more.

So it is probable that it is screenshots saved as .tiff files you have recieved - is my guess :-)

Cheers

solbjerg

 

 

I received a packet of .tiff files from a friend and converted them to .jpg. I was amazed to find that the .tiff files are very much smaller that the jpgs. The clarity of the .tiff files is every bit as good as the jpgs, so what are the pros and cons of the two types?
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Hi guys,

 

I sure don't know a lot about .tiff files, but this is a good read :

http://www.awaresystems.be/imaging/tiff/faq.html

 

In the answer to question #1 :

Another major difference between most other image file formats and TIFF, is that TIFF allows for a wide range of different compression schemes and color spaces. These are specified in dedicated tags. Where other file formats are often designed to suit a single compression method, TIFF allows for JPEG or JBIG compression, the infamous LZW or the free-as-a-bird deflate compression, amongst many others. The same goes for color spaces. Theoretically, you could even use any compression method and color space of your own, though it goes without saying this would result in crippled portability.

 

I remember the first time I tried to convert a .tiff file from Microsoft Office file imaging (or scanning) to .jpeg

I scratched my head for a while there, trying different free .tiff file converters. I couldn't understand why they didn't work, until I found one that did, and then I read about the different .tiff file standards.

 

Different tiffs, different strokes for different folks, folks 8)

 

===

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Hi So_sad

Thanks for the link!!! - I now know a lot more about the subject :-)

 

When I did my "test" I just used Paint to save in the different formats.

 

Cheers

solbjerg

 

 

Hi guys,

 

I sure don't know a lot about .tiff files, but this is a good read :

http://www.awaresystems.be/imaging/tiff/faq.html

 

In the answer to question #1 :

 

 

I remember the first time I tried to convert a .tiff file from Microsoft Office file imaging (or scanning) to .jpeg

I scratched my head for a while there, trying different free .tiff file converters. I couldn't understand why they didn't work, until I found one that did, and then I read about the different .tiff file standards.

 

Different tiffs, different strokes for different folks, folks 8)

 

===

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